Posted by: gourmetfelted | August 13, 2009

NEEDLE FELTED BLOG~ ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION~JUST NOW~CHIPMUNK by MARSHA~NEWBIE!

chipmunch 005chipmunch 018

~CHIPMUNK~NOW

Hello,  I wanted to post a pic of my first feltie.   I used your wire armature method and it made everything so easy! Plus I can pose my chipmunk any way.  I used natural llama and think he looks pretty good for a first try!!  Thanks for the great site to share!! Marsha Kay

PS I am working on a great horned owl next.  This is soooo fun!!


Responses

  1. Hi Marsha,
    Welcome to my blog! This is so adorable! Great job especially since it’s your first! Love the pic with the acorn!!LOL! I’m so glad that you could get help from my blog. I would love to see your owl!! You are ambitious! Thank you for your entry!
    HAPPY FELTING!
    ~Gerry

  2. Wow it looks so real. That is amazing. I so want to try felting – but have been putting it off and off because I am afraid my chipmunk would come out looking like a rock… And Gerry — wow. your creations are inspiring.

  3. Hi Corinne, Welcome to my blog! I have a pumpkin needle felting kit which is the perfect thing for beginners! See my shop on Etsy. Plus I am always available for help…just an email away!
    http://www.gfelted.etsy.com
    click on needle felting kit in right column
    You’ll love it!
    ~Gerry

  4. Thank you!! I really think your wire armiture makes it so much easier. The arm and leg length are easier to keep in proportion if your get the skeleton right first. Also, you get the elbows and wrists bending the right way!! I googled chipmunk skeleton online and printed it out. Did the same think for the owl.

    However, I might be changing the owl to a bluejay or a cardinal!! I have tried a number of times to get the pattern on the owl’s chest area to look right. Still cant get it, so I think I will go to a more solid colored bird and will try an owl when I have more experience. Bird skeletons are very similiar anyway.

    My ONLY frustration is breaking needles on the wire armiture. The felting itself is nothing but fun!!!

  5. Wonderful job, he looks great. Your pictures are so good, he looks right at home in the tree with his acorn. Feathers are the hardest to felt I think, they have to look so light and airy lol.

    Gerry has helped me so much with her blog. It is so rare to find such a talented artist willing to share so many of her tips and techniques. Thanks again.

    • I have been combing llama with the carding combs (not brushes) you can pull off some REALLY fine fluffy tuffs that will look very feathery.

      The owl has a scalloped pattern over a molted three color chest. The three collor blend is not too hard but getting very fine scalops all down the front is really tricky!!

      I bought some raw wool and washed it. (this is not as easy as washing llama as the lanoline is not easy to get out.) Mine was an unatractive grey brown so not much use as a finish coating. However, the sheep wool really felts easily and firmly. It makes a really good core and can be covered with the colored llama..

  6. I would love to see a picture of how you are felting the feathers, I am making a rooster now and almost ready to start adding the feathers. I have an idea in my head to make him look “real”. I hope it works lol.

  7. OH!! I have not finished the feathers BUT have figured out a way to varry the colors to get the right owl wing pattern. I first covered the wire armiture for the wings with a coat of wool . I took long carded sections of wool in different colors and twisted them like a candycane. Then I felt the long “candycane” onto the felted wire going left to right(nedling it onto the covered wire) then right to left in a long snake. I felt one layer onto the existing layer, and then back again. It does allow you to stretch or shorten the snake to get the colors in place to make a good “owl wing” pattern. You could use solid colors as well.. I thinned out to snakes as I worked down so the wing got thinner and thinner.

  8. WOW! Aren’t you the clever one!


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